Today’s food systems are no longer fit for purpose. Decision makers, particularly governments in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and their development partners, need to take urgent action to change the ways in which food systems are currently managed, governed, and used. This is essential to achieve the goal of sustainable, healthy diets 3 for all.

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  1. In this report, ‘sustainable diets’ are diets that are delivered by a ‘sustainable food system’. This means that the contribution of any food system (which delivers locally produced as well as imported and marketed foods) can be
    continued without undermining the ability of the natural environment to function in the long term. As such, such a system does not drive biodiversity loss, pollution, depletion of natural capital, or impaired ecosystem services, nor does it contribute substantially to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
  2. In this report, ‘sustainable diets’ are diets that are delivered by a ‘sustainable food system’. This means that the contribution of any food system (which delivers locally produced as well as imported and marketed foods) can be
    continued without undermining the ability of the natural environment to function in the long term. As such, such a system does not drive biodiversity loss, pollution, depletion of natural capital, or impaired ecosystem services, nor does it contribute substantially to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
  3. In this report, ‘sustainable diets’ are diets that are delivered by a ‘sustainable food system’. This means that the contribution of any food system (which delivers locally produced as well as imported and marketed foods) can be
    continued without undermining the ability of the natural environment to function in the long term. As such, such a system does not drive biodiversity loss, pollution, depletion of natural capital, or impaired ecosystem services, nor does it contribute substantially to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.